Princeton Strong news – Princeton, NJ: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation reports 5.28.2020.

The Coronavirus pandemic continues to expose inequities in America. While every community is experiencing harm, certain groups are suffering disproportionately, including people of color, workers with low incomes, and people living in places that were already struggling financially before the economic downturn.

That’s why Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has outlined five principles that serve as a compass for leaders toward an equitable and lasting recovery. For communities to recover fully and fairly, state and local leaders must set priorities and make decisions based on the experiences of those already most challenged and on the brink.

Rich Besser, President at Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Health Equity Principles for State and Local Leaders in Responding to, Reopening and Recovering from COVID-19.

COVID-19 has unleashed a dual threat to health equity in the United States: a pandemic that has sickened millions and killed tens of thousands and counting, and an economic downturn that has resulted in tens of millions of people losing jobs—the highest numbers since the Great Depression. The COVID pandemic underscores that: Our health is inextricably linked to that of our neighbors, family members, child- and adult-care providers, co-workers, school teachers, delivery service people, grocery store clerks, factory workers, and first responders, among others; Our current health care, public health, and economic systems do not adequately or equitably protect our well-being as a nation; and Every community is experiencing harm, though certain groups are suffering disproportionately, including people of color, workers with low incomes, and people living in places that were already struggling financially before the economic downturn. For communities and their residents to recover fully and fairly, state and local leaders should consider the following health equity principles in designing and implementing their responses. These principles are not a detailed public health guide for responding to the pandemic or reopening the economy, but rather a compass that continually points leaders toward an equitable and lasting recovery.

Health Equity Principles

1. Collect, analyze and report disaggregated data.

2.Include those who are most affected in decisions, and benchmark progress based on their outcomes.

3. Establish and empower teams dedicated to racial equity.

4. Proactively fill policy gaps while advocating for more federal support.

5.Invest in public health, health care and social infrastructure.

Share More:
https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2020/05/health-equity-principles-for-state-and-local-leaders-in-responding-to-reopening-and-recovering-from-covid-19.html?

NJ Health Commissioner and Governor Phil Murphy closely discuss COVID-19 Pandemic during presser 5.13.2020. POOL photo by Rich Hundley